UK news Headlines

  • Growth of AI could expand security threats if no action taken, report warns

    Artificial intelligence tech could lead to new forms of cybercrime, political disruption and physical attacks within five years say experts Wanton proliferation of artificial intelligence technologies could enable new forms of cybercrime, political disruption and even physical attacks within five years, a group of 26 experts from around the world have warned. In a new report, the academic, industry and the charitable sector experts, describe AI as a “dual use technology” with potential military...

    the Guardian
  • Climate change 'will push European cities towards breaking point'

    Study highlights urgent need to adapt urban areas to cope with floods, droughts and heatwaves Major British towns and cities, including Glasgow, Wrexham, Aberdeen and Chester, could be much more severely affected by climate change than previously thought, according to new research. The study, by Newcastle University, analysed changes in flooding, droughts and heatwaves for every European city using all climate models. Continue reading...

    the Guardian
  • Queen makes surprise appearance at London fashion week

    Monarch watches Richard Quinn’s show and then presents him with British design award There are few people that can get the usually aloof fashion crowd giggling in a state of high excitement. But then there is only one Queen of England. Her Majesty was a surprise guest on Tuesday afternoon at Richard Quinn’s show, the last of London fashion week and his second ever. There was a hush as she entered the room, with the audience standing up to greet the monarch and, of course, raising their phones...

    the Guardian
  • Airlines sound alarm over 'blank cheque' for Heathrow third runway

    Bosses from British Airways, Virgin and easyJet urge MPs to secure pledge on cost before vote The true cost of Heathrow expansion is likely to be “grossly” higher than the £14.3bn the airport has cited, airlines have told MPs, adding that transparency and guarantees should be supplied ahead of a crucial vote. Willie Walsh, chief executive of IAG, British Airways’ parent company and the main operator at Heathrow, said parliament should not trust Heathrow and said he had “zero confidence” that a...

    the Guardian
  • Oxfam sexual abuse scandal is built on the aid industry’s white saviour mentality

    I’ve seen for myself how agencies operate, and the toxic and exploitative relationships that can so easily develop A century ago doctors began to take notice of a disturbing condition affecting white men in “the tropics”. These men, hard at work with empire-building and civilising natives, were suffering from a kind of nervous breakdown: a mysterious condition that was so widespread it accounted for as many medical discharges as better known illnesses, such as malaria. Symptoms included...

    the Guardian
  • No evidence Corbyn was spy for Czechoslovakia, say intelligence experts

    Researchers say archives show Labour leader was not a ‘witting collaborator’ Communist-era files from the intelligence agency of Czechoslovakia provide no evidence that Jeremy Corbyn was ever a spy or agent of influence, experts and academic researchers who have reviewed the papers said on Tuesday. Radek Schovánek, an analyst with the defence ministry of the Czech Republic – which emerged, along with Slovakia, from the peaceful breakup of Czechoslovakia in 1993 – has spent 25 years researching...

    the Guardian
  • FBI arrests Briton over disappearance of wife from yacht

    Lewis Bennett, 41, arrested on suspicion of murder as he waited to be sentenced for smuggling A British man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering his wife, who he reported missing as they sailed off the coast of Cuba last year, the FBI has announced. Lewis Bennett, 41, of Poole, Dorset, was arrested while he was waiting to be sentenced at a court in Miami for smuggling stolen coins during the voyage in May from which he was rescued alone. Continue reading...

    the Guardian
  • UK's oldest lottery winners scoop £18m jackpot

    Dennis Banfield, 87, and wife Shirley, 83, plan to share winnings with their daughters A couple from Bristol have become the oldest winners of the UK lottery, after scooping an £18m jackpot. Speaking at a hotel in Gloucestershire on Tuesday as they announced their good fortune, Dennis Banfield, 87, became emotional as he tried to describe what the win meant to him. He added that he and his wife, Shirley, 83, will share their winnings with their daughters. Continue reading...

    the Guardian
  • Jeremy Corbyn spy tales revive reds under the bed paranoia

    Former Chatham House deputy director William Wallace, Labour supporter Linda Walker and former keen young communist Tim Webb respond to claims about the party leader’s contacts with a Czechoslovakian intelligence officer Can I, as a Liberal Democrat, come to the defence of Jeremy Corbyn, as stories of his contacts with eastern bloc diplomats run through the rightwing media? In the 1970s and 1980s, London swarmed with Russian and other diplomats, offering excellent lunches and presents to take...

    the Guardian
  • The need for an internet sales tax

    Letter from Richard Stallman, president of the Free Software Foundation Replacement of physical stores with internet sales is bad for people’s rights (Maplin seeks buyer, 20 February), because internet sales track people; they don’t allow privacy-respecting cash.It’s bad for the Treasury because the internet giants such as Amazon avoid taxes, and because jobs disappear. It is bad for society because it means fewer jobs. This suggests solving both problems with a substantial tax on internet...

    the Guardian
  • FCA's chair-elect admits 'error of judgment' over tax avoidance scheme

    Charles Randell tells MPs he repaid HMRC more than £100,000 after Ingenious investment The incoming chairman of the Financial Conduct Authority has admitted to an “error of judgment” after investing in a controversial tax avoidance scheme that resulted in him repaying more than £100,000 to the taxman. Charles Randell, a former City lawyer and government adviser at the time of the financial crisis, told the Treasury select committee that he had failed to see a “warning signal” about Ingenious...

    the Guardian
  • Popping into Picasso's: stranger's holiday snaps of artist on show

    Images taken in France 64 years ago by an amateur photographer revealed by Lightbox Gallery For half a lifetime after Stanley Stanley met a jolly, heavily tanned, bald man on the beach at Antibes, the prints and hand-painted plate he brought backas a souvenir of their time in southern France were stored away under his socks in a chest of drawers. This spring, that evidence of the encounter between Stanley, an amateur photographer, and the bald man – Pablo Picasso – will be seen for the first...

    the Guardian
  • Police admit officer’s role in mass release of mink by protesters

    Animal rights group infiltrated by undercover officer who took part in 1998 raid on New Forest farm Police have apologised after admitting that one of their undercover officers helped to release thousands of mink into the countryside, wreaking havoc in the New Forest. The undercover officer, Christine Green, was pretending to be an animal rights activist when she took part in a raid in Hampshire to release up to 6,000 mink from a farm in 1998. Continue reading...

    the Guardian
  • Another day another cabinet minister's confusing Brexit vision

    Where Boris Johnson argued for a deregulated future, David Davis wants to leave lawless EU to create better and more regulations It seems there might be a plan after all. If you’re sufficiently confused yourself there’s no better way of communicating that confusion to your enemies than by sending out several members of the cabinet to relay your Brexit vision. And getting them to say something different every time. Just about the only living things close to Number 10 not to be given the chance...

    the Guardian
  • Jeremy Corbyn calls spy allegations 'nonsense'

    The Labour leader denied claims he was an informant for Czechoslovakia in the 1980s Jeremy Corbyn has ridiculed the idea that he gave information to a communist spy during the cold war, calling the idea “nonsense” and castigating the newspapers that claimed he did so. The Labour leader has faced several days of headlines in some newspapers about supposed meetings during the 1980s with Ján Sarkocy, a Czechoslovakian diplomat in London who was later expelled as a spy. Continue reading...

    the Guardian
  • MPs publish full unredacted report into RBS small business scandal

    Treasury committee releases details of ‘widespread inappropriate treatment’ that City watchdog refused to make public The Treasury committee has published the full unredacted report into Royal Bank of Scotland’s “disgraceful” treatment of struggling small businesses that came to it for financial assistance in the wake of the banking crisis. The influential group of MPs, chaired by Nicky Morgan, released the report after a long-running stand-off with City watchdog the Financial Conduct...

    the Guardian
  • Oxfam: '7,000 people have cancelled their regular donations' – video

    Mark Goldring, Oxfam’s chief executive, tells MPs that about 7,000 individuals have cancelled their regular donations to the charity after revelations of the Haiti sex scandal. Goldring also said that 26 new sexual misconduct allegations have been reported as a result of the disclosuresOxfam hit by 26 new sexual misconduct allegations since Haiti scandal broke, MPs told – Politics live Continue reading...

    the Guardian
  • Plastic bans worldwide will dent oil demand growth, says BP

    But oil giant expects demand for crude to grow and not peak until late 2030s Bans around the world on single use plastic items such as carrier bags will dent growth in oil demand over the next two decades, according to BP. However, the UK-headquartered oil and gas firm said it still expects the global hunger for crude to grow for years and not peak until the late 2030s. Continue reading...

    the Guardian
  • Woman who left abusive note on ambulance admits public order offence

    Kirsty Sharman told emergency crew in Stoke to ‘move your f***ing van’ from outside house A woman has pleaded guilty to a public order offence after she verbally abused paramedics and left a foul-mouthed note on their ambulance in Stoke-on-Trent. Kirsty Sharman, 26, was charged after a social media appeal by West Midlands Ambulance Service staff, who reported at the weekend that colleagues had found a hand-written note on the rear window of the vehicle. Continue reading...

    the Guardian
  • KFC was warned about switching UK delivery contractor, union says

    GMB union says it expressed doubts about DHL’s ability to run operation from single warehouse The fast food chain KFC was warned it would face delivery problems months ago, it has been claimed, as the company tries to grapple with a worsening chicken supply crisis that has forced most of its outlets to remain closed. Some 420 KFC stores are currently shut after the company switched deliveries to a cheaper service. An updated list showed that the number of open outlets rose to 480 by 1pm on...

    the Guardian
  • David Davis: Brexit Britain will not be a 'Mad Max' dystopian world – video

    David Davis says there will not be a 'Anglo-Saxon race to the bottom' that some fear post-Brexit. The Brexit secretary, speaking to business leaders in Vienna, said his message to the room was that Brexit goals 'will not change the kind of country Britain is'Brexit 'will not change kind of country Britain is', vows David Davis Continue reading...

    the Guardian
  • Supreme court begins hearing plumber's employment case

    Ruling in Pimlico Plumbers case will set precedent for other gig economy disputes such as Uber The predicament of a plumber who claims he was dismissed because he wanted to go part time is being examined by the supreme court in a test case that could decide employment rights for all of those in the so-called “gig” economy. Pimlico Plumbers, which has lost at every stage of the legal dispute, has appealed to the UK’s highest court to argue that those it sends out to repair leaking pipes and...

    the Guardian
  • Alan Partridge and Nigel Farage: they would 'get on like a house on fire'

    Fictional Tory-voting broadcaster would have been tempted to vote Ukip, says his creator Steve Coogan Alan Partridge and the former Ukip leader Nigel Farage would get on “like a house on fire”, the comedy character’s creator Steve Coogan has said. The writer, actor and comedian is set to bring the fictional radio DJ back to the BBC in a new series, This Time With Alan Partridge, which began filming earlier this month. He said the fictional broadcaster has evolved since he first started playing...

    the Guardian
  • Oxfam boss apologises to MPs over abuse of Haiti quake victims

    Mark Goldring admits 7,000 people have cancelled donations to the charity since scandal broke Mark Goldring, the head of Oxfam, has apologised to MPs for the actions of staff who sexually exploited female victims of the Haiti earthquake in 2010. He acknowledged that the charity’s actions had damaged the whole aid community, as well as the people of Haiti. Goldring told the Commons international development committee that 7,000 people had cancelled their donations since the scandal broke....

    the Guardian