World news Headlines

  • Hugh Masekela, South African jazz trumpeter, dies aged 78

    Man known as father of South African jazz had career spanning more than five decades From the archive video interview: When I look at the time left, I have to hurry up Hugh Masekela, the legendary South African jazz musician, has died aged 78. A statement from the trumpeter’s family said that Masekela “passed peacefully” in Johannesburg, where he lived and worked for much of his life. Continue reading...

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  • Hammond dismisses Johnson's talk of post-Brexit NHS dividend

    Foreign secretary calls for more funds but chancellor says economy is suffering Economic confidence is suffering due to the UK’s impending withdrawal from the EU, Philip Hammond has said, as he pointedly knocked down demands from Boris Johnson for a “Brexit dividend” for the NHS, in a sign of growing divisions within the government. Continue reading...

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  • Davos 2018: Narendra Modi, Justin Trudeau and Cate Blanchett speak

    Rolling coverage of the opening day of the World Economic Forum in Davos, including speeches by Indian PM Narendra Modi and Canada’s Justin TrudeauIntroduction: World leaders, key issues, and lots of snow 8.02am GMT UBS’s chairman, Axel Weber, has warned that sentiment in the market is “too buoyant”. Speaking on CNBC this morning, Weber said there was a worrying gap between investor optimism and the actual state of the economy. Investors are taking risks, but I don’t think they’re getting...

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  • Brazil braces for corruption appeal that could make or break ex-president

    Civil unrest expected as Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, still hugely popular despite corruption conviction, fights to stay in upcoming election race Brazil is bracing for a historic court decision which could remove the most popular leader in modern Brazilian history from an election he is currently poised to win – and may prove devastating to the leftwing Workers’ party he founded. Nerves are stretched taut ahead of Wednesday’s appeals court decision, in which three judges will decide whether or...

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  • Thai seafood: are the prawns on your plate still fished by slaves?

    Report finds trafficking persists on Thai fishing boats, as campaigners challenge retailers to guarantee products are free of rights abuses Thailand’s billion-dollar seafood export industry remains infested with human rights abuses despite government pledges to stamp out slavery in its fishing industry, according to research by Human Rights Watch. Four years after damning revelations of chattel slavery aboard Thai fishing boats linked to seafood exported and sold by major retailers around the...

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  • Michigan man held over threats to kill CNN staff

    Brandon Griesemer, 19, allegedly called network 22 times, referring to it as ‘fake news’ A Michigan man has been arrested for threatening to kill CNN employees after telephoning the network and saying: “Fake news. I’m coming to gun you all down.” Brandon Griesemer appeared in federal court in Detroit on Friday charged with using interstate communications to threaten injury. Continue reading...

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  • Indian education minister dismisses theory of evolution

    Scientists condemn Satyapal Singh for saying ‘Darwin’s theory is scientifically wrong’ India’s minister for higher education has been condemned by scientists for demanding the theory of evolution be removed from school curricula because no one “ever saw an ape turning into a human being”. Satyapal Singh stood by his comments on Monday, saying his ministry was ready to host an international conference where “scientists can come out and say where they stand on the issue”. Continue reading...

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  • North Korea tops list of world's most neglected humanitarian crises

    Study says country’s severe food shortages are ignored by global media, with emergencies in Eritrea and Burundi similarly overlooked The deepening humanitarian emergency in North Korea is the least reported in the world, according to a study that measures media coverage of crises across the globe. While insults traded between Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un dominated headlines, North Korea’s severe food shortages, estimated to have left two in five of its population undernourished, received little...

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  • How a new technology is changing the lives of people who cannot speak

    Millions are robbed of the power of speech by illness, injury or lifelong conditions. Can the creation of bespoke digital voices transform their ability to communicate? By Jordan Kisner Last November, Joe Morris, a 31-year-old film-maker from London, noticed a sore spot on his tongue. He figured he’d bitten himself in his sleep and thought nothing more about it until halfway through the winter holidays, when he realised the sore was still with him. He Googled “cut on tongue won’t heal” and,...

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  • Satellite Eye on Earth: November and December 2017

    Winter solstice, night lights and interesting islands are among the images captured by Nasa and the ESA last month Dust blowing out of the Copper River valley on Alaska’s south coast. The dust plume was likely comprised of fine-grained loess, which was formed as glacial ice moved over the area and ground the underlying rock into a powder. Dust storms in southern Alaska generally occur in late autumn, when river levels are relatively low, snow has not yet fallen, and the layers of dried,...

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  • Brexit threatens European social progress – leftwingers must speak up

    Now is the time for campaigners across the continent to reach out to Labour, and help stop Britain from going off the rails Thirty years ago a French socialist, Jacques Delors, then president of the European commission, travelled to Bournemouth to speak to the British Trades Union Congress. Delors argued for a “social Europe” in a speech that contributed to swinging the mood among the British left, parts of which had long had misgivings about the European project – doubts that linger today. Last...

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  • #knitforJacinda: New Zealanders join forces to make baby clothes for the needy

    Inspired by the prime minister’s pregnancy, scores of people across the country are knitting booties and hats and donating them to children’s wards New Zealanders have started clicking their knitting needles together for prime minister Jacinda Ardern’s baby - but the woollen booties, bonnets and blankets are not destined for parliament house. Last week Ardern announced she and partner Clarke Gayford are expecting their first child together, a baby of unknown gender who is due in June, and has...

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  • Somali citizens count cost of surge in US airstrikes under Trump

    The Guardian has investigated scores of reports of US-led strikes targeting al-Shabaab, which have risen to unprecedented levels Dozens of civilians have been killed and wounded in Somalia as US-led airstrikes against Islamist militants increase to unprecedented levels, a Guardian investigation has found, raising fears that Washington’s actions could bolster support for extremists. The escalation in strikes is part of the Trump administration’s broader foreign policy strategy in Africa and the...

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  • US air wars under Trump: increasingly indiscriminate, increasingly opaque

    Lack of transparency over looser rules of engagement is hallmark of administration, writes Julian Borger The escalating air war in Somalia is part of a global pattern of an ever broader and unfettered use of air power that has it roots in the Obama administration but which has been spurred on and expanded under Donald Trump. In the first year of his presidency, Trump has gone out of his way to claim credit for the defeats inflicted on Islamic State, attributing it to his loosening of constraints...

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  • Congo steps up deadly crackdown after more protests against Kabila

    Clergy among hundreds detained as Catholic church leads call for president to step down Hundreds of people have been arrested in a wide-ranging crackdown in the Democratic Republic of the Congo after fresh protests against the continued rule of President Joseph Kabila. Security forces shot dead at least six people and wounded dozens more as they fired teargas to disperse demonstrations organised by the Catholic church on Sunday. Among the victims was a woman who had wanted to become a nun,...

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  • Turkey's preoccupation with Syrian Kurds could spell disaster for US

    The west cannot afford to lose Ankara’s role as a countervailing force to a Russian-imposed peace The US, Britain and France have all strongly criticised the Turkish invasion of northern Syria, but the three countries have so far been unwilling to instruct their Nato partner to pull back. The low-key stance urging Turkey to minimise casualties probably means Ankara can press ahead with its attempts to drive the Syrian Kurds out of Afrin province in north-west Syria. Continue reading...

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  • Italy elections: as left splinters, Berlusconi waits in wings

    The only thing pundits can agree on is the ruling Democratic party seems headed for a humiliating defeat Ask anyone in Italy about who might be sitting at the head of government in Palazzo Chigi following national elections on 4 March and the answer is a collective shrug of the shoulder. Silvio Berlusconi, the former prime minister and master of reinvention, has portrayed the centre-right coalition he leads as a safe pair of hands against the insurgency of the populist Five Star Movement, which...

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  • Japan: avalanche engulfs skiers after volcano erupts at ski resort

    Rescuers search for missing skier after rocks rain down on the slopes of Kusatsu-Shirane, injuring fifteen people Skiers in Japan have been injured and one is missing after a volcano erupted near a ski resort, triggering an avalanche and sending rocks raining down on the slopes. A dozen skiers were trapped by the avalanche and 15 were injured by falling volcanic rocks, according to local media. Continue reading...

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  • Sweden summons Chinese ambassador over 'kidnapping' of Gui Minhai

    Sweden’s foreign minister says the situation has worsened since the bookseller was taken by police while travelling on a train to Beijing Sweden has summoned China’s ambassador to Stockholm to explain the dramatic snatching of a Swedish bookseller as he travelled to Beijing with two European diplomats. Gui Minhai, 53, was taken on Saturday by about 10 plainclothes officers as his train stopped at a station outside the Chinese capital. His current whereabouts is unknown. Continue reading...

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  • Snow falling on leaders: 'exceptional' winter weather delays VIP arrivals to Davos

    Heaviest snowfall for 20 years disrupts traffic, slips up business chiefs and threatens to block the landing of VIP helicopters Heavy snowfall has hampered the arrival of world leaders, business executives and charity bosses at this week’s World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland. The exclusive ski resort was snow-bound on Monday after the heaviest precipitation in two decades. Continue reading...

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  • Second group of Manus Island refugees depart for US under resettlement deal

    Fifty-eight men leave ‘hell that the Australian government made for us’ months after 54 refugees sent to US The second group of refugees to be accepted for resettlement in the United States from Australia’s offshore immigration regime has left Papua New Guinea for America. Fifty-eight refugees will fly from PNG on Tuesday – most after more than four years held on Manus Island. They will fly to the US east coast, from where they will be resettled, individually and in groups, across the country....

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  • Jimmy Carr criticised for saying New Zealand city needs earthquake to look better

    Comedian branded insensitive for tweet that Dunedin, the country’s oldest city, would benefit from a rebuild British comedian Jimmy Carr has caused offence in New Zealand by suggesting the country’s oldest city – Dunedin – could be improved by an earthquake. The comedian has been touring the country and last night performed in Dunedin, on the lower east coast of the South Island. Continue reading...

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  • Brussels could pay EU nationals' application fees to stay in UK

    Juncker said to sympathise with proposal to cover expected £72 cost to seek ‘settled status’ Brussels could seek the moral high ground by covering the application costs of EU nationals who want to stay in the UK after Brexit, under proposals being discussed at the highest levels of the European commission. The UK Home Office has threatened to charge a £72 fee for applicants seeking so-called “settled status” in the UK, which grants them indefinite leave to remain. Applicants will have to...

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  • Chelsea Manning says she attended far-right pro-Trump event 'to gather intel'

    Former whistleblower pictured at party thrown by conspiracy theorist Mike Cernovich, but she insists it was purely for intelligence gathering Chelsea Manning, the former whistleblower who is now running for the US Senate, is defending herself against accusations that she has forged links with the far right after she appeared at a pro-Trump party thrown by notorious conspiracy theorist Mike Cernovich. Related: Chelsea Manning: 'I'm a very different person than I was 10 years ago' Continue...

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