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  • How North Korea Defeated America Early in the Korean War

    Michael Peck History, Asia An unfortunate battle for Task Force Smith. Key point: Underfunded, undertrained, and outmanned units cannot be expected to do the impossible. Here's what went wrong. In July 1950, North Korea defeated the United States Army. This wasn’t supposed to happen. In the summer of 1950, America was still savoring the glow of absolute victory in World War II. There was the Soviet threat, to be sure, and a Communist bloc swelled by the massive addition of China in 1949. But...

    The National Interest
  • America and South Korea Want Stability—and North Korea Knows It

    Richard Javad Heydarian Politics, Asia Perhaps no one will rock the boat? They say it is only in times of difficulty when you truly know who your true friends are. Well, in the world of high-stakes geopolitics, it’s a matter of knowing who, at the very least, has an interest in a strongman remaining alive, when too many are too eager to see him dead. Among the most revealing episodes during the recent brouhaha over Kim Jung-un’s misreported death last month was the reaction of the South Korean...

    The National Interest
  • How South Korea’s Politics and Military Impacts Strategic Stability With North Korea

    John Dale Grover Security, Asia Seoul’s elites are divided over how Pyongyang perceives South Korean intentions and capabilities. Will they ever agree on how to deter and engage the North? Editor’s note: John Dale Grover is a Korean Studies fellow at the Center for the National Interest. He visited Seoul for a week in early November 2019 to interview nine experts in South Korea for this project. This is the first piece in a five-article series, “How South Korea’s Politics and Military Impacts...

    The National Interest
  • Divided Elites: Where South Korea’s Engagers and Deterers Agree—and Disagree—About North Korea

    John Dale Grover Politics, Asia There is more room for cooperation than U.S. observers might think, but fundamental disagreements remain strong. Editor’s note: John Dale Grover is a Korean Studies fellow at the Center for the National Interest. He visited Seoul for a week in early November 2019 to interview nine experts in South Korea for this project. This is the fourth piece in a five-article series, “How South Korea’s Politics and Military Impacts Strategic Stability with North Korea.” This...

    The National Interest