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  • How America Bombed Nazi Germany Back into the Stone Age (And Won World War II)

    Warfare History Network History, Americas By the time the invasion of France began, American bomber losses had dropped to negligible proportions, and the Luftwaffe had been virtually driven from the skies over its own homeland. Key point: America's learning curve went past air superiority and straight to air supremacy. The popular conception of the struggle in the air over northern Europe during World War II is of squadrons of sleek fighters racing over the German heartland to protect...

    The National Interest
  • No Hitler, No World War II? (He Almost Died During World War I)

    Sebastien Roblin History, Europe Millions of lives could have been saved. Key point: The rise of fascism and the war were tied to larger historical currents, but the Nazi Party owed a lot to Hitler himself. Legend has it that on September 28, 1918, a wounded Private Adolf Hitler lay in the sights of Henry Tandey, a British soldier who would receive the Victoria Cross for his daring actions in engagement in Marcoing, France. Tandey supposedly took pity on the limping German soldier, who nodded...

    The National Interest
  • Four Decisions Could Have Won Imperial Germany World War I

    Michael Peck Security, Europe Don't underestimate the power of Imperial Germany.​ Here's What You Need To Remember: It is also easy to assume that German defeat was inevitable at the hands of an Allied coalition richer in manpower, weapons and money. Yet Germany nearly captured Paris in 1914, crushed Serbia and Romania, bled the French Army until it mutinied, drove Russia out of the war, and then came oh-so-close to victory on the Western Front in 1918. Don't underestimate the power of...

    The National Interest
  • How Nazi Germany Wins World War II: Dump Hitler?

    David T. Pyne History, Europe Could they have waged the war they wanted? Key Point: No one was more responsible for Germany's defeat than Adolf Hitler.  In our last installment, we discussed the ways how Germany might have defeated the Soviet Union. In this article, we will discuss why Adolf Hitler was Germany’s greatest obstacle to winning World War II and how the war might have been won without if German generals could have prevented him from interfering in military operations. Hitler, a...

    The National Interest
  • One of the Most Popular Weapons of World War II (and After) Was Developed by Nazi Germany

    Caleb Larson History, Europe The MP 40 was prized for its overall reliability and ease of use and was optimized for mass-production. Here's What You Need To Remember: Thanks to high production numbers, the MP 40 was also employed after the Second World War in a number of other conflicts. The iconic MP 40 was a German submachine gun designed in the late 1930s that built upon earlier domestic submachine gun designs. The MP 40 was a fully automatic-only weapon, meaning that single shots could not...

    The National Interest
  • Nazi Germany Produced More Machine Guns Than Any Other Nation in World War II

    Peter Suciu Security, Europe Thank god it did not win Hitler the war. What a difference 100 years made in the course of war. When the armies of Europe faced each other on the battlefields across the continent during the Napoleonic Wars, soldiers could successfully fire three to four rounds a minute. During the First World War, millions were killed and one invention had changed warfare forever—the 1884 Maxim Gun. Sir Hiram Stevens Maxim was an inventor who held numerous patents—including for a...

    The National Interest
  • How Germany Bested America In The World War II Heavy Tank Race

    Michael Peck Security, The Germans and Soviets both employed heavy tanks as breakthrough vehicles, which traded speed for heavier armament and armor to enable them to penetrate fortified lines. Here's What You Need To Remember: The United States was the exception. From World War I until after World War II, the U.S. military had a requirement for a heavy tank that was never really fulfilled, notes tank historian R. P. Hunnicutt in his book Firepower: A History of the American Heavy Tank. Until...

    The National Interest