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  • This week in Savage Love: Kink monsters

    My husband and I (straight male/bi female couple) have been married 15 years. We are in our early 40s. When we met, he was inexperienced and crippled by shame from having grown up in an extremely sex-negative atmosphere. I have no hang-ups about sex and was happy to get him involved in some more adventurous stuff—but

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  • Michel Fiffe pays tribute to his comic idols with Copra’s superhero remix

    Knowing how superhero publishers have treated the creators of their billion-dollar IP, working with Marvel and DC to tell new stories with those characters might not be the best way to honor those legends who shaped the genre. For the last seven years, Michel Fiffe has carried on the legacy of his artistic heroes in

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  • Marvel’s teenage heroes are Outlawed in this exclusive first look

    The life of a teenaged superhero is never easy, but it’s about to get a lot harder for the young vigilantes of the Marvel Universe. March’s Outlawed one-shot introduces a new status quo that has the government cracking down on superheroes under the age of 21, and these events will have repercussions across the publisher’s entire line. Written by Eve L. Ewing with art by Kim Jacinto, colorist Espen Grundetjern, and letterer Clayton Cowles, Outlawed sees the country rocked by a tragedy involving...

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  • Alfred taunts the Dark Knight in this Batman’s Grave exclusive

    Warren Ellis and Bryan Hitch changed the superhero game when they debuted The Authority in 1999, bringing a widescreen cinematic aesthetic to the genre that would shape how superheroes were presented in the new millennium. 20 years later, Ellis and Hitch have reunited for The Batman’s Grave, a standalone 12-issue miniseries that spotlights how well these two creators work together. Featuring inks by Kevin Nowlan, colors by Alex Sinclair, and letters by Richard Starkings, The Batman’s Grave leans...

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  • This week in Podmass: Harmontown is no longer in session

    December 6 marked the 50th anniversary of the Altamont Speedway Free Festival, the day-long concert headlined by The Rolling Stones that turned into a disaster for everyone involved, onstage and off. The show was already captured on film for the 1970 documentary Gimme Shelter (and writer Saul Austerlitz dropped a book

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  • What are you reading in December?

    In our monthly book club, we discuss whatever we happen to be reading and ask everyone in the comments to do the same. What Are You Reading This Month? Read more

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  • Penn & Teller’s maddening unreleased video game became a cult sensation online

    Smoke And Mirrors was a series of minigames intended to prank the friends of whoever bought the game.

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  • Man eats expensive art banana in act that is also somehow apparently art

    Blurring the line between the worlds of high art and low snacking, a performance artist at a Miami art gallery has just indulged in one of the most expensive potassium refills in artistic history. Per TMZ, David Datuna was in attendance today at Miami’s Art Basel gallery—which recently made waves when it sold an installation by artist Maurizio Cattelan, consisting of a single banana duct-taped to a wall, for $120,000—when he decided to pull said art-fruit from its moorings, peel it, and then...

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  • Riverdale podcast Dial M For Maple gets its wish when the teens finally go to therapy

    If this week’s Riverdale seems familiar to longtime listeners of Dial M For Maple, that may be because we pitched an episode just like this on our podcast last season. After nearly four years of serial killers, diabolical family members, cults, and bear attacks, the teens of Riverdale have some serious trauma to unpack. Thankfully, help comes in the form of guest actor Gina Torres—a.k.a. school counselor Mrs. Burble—whose straight talk and thoughtful insights provide the series with a...

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  • Morbius unleashes the raging beast within in this exclusive preview

    Morbius, the living vampire, is getting his own solo superhero movie starring Jared Leto next year, so naturally Marvel has given the character a new ongoing series to capitalize on a potential boost in popularity. Written by Vita Ayala with art by Marcelo Ferreira, inkers Roberto Poggi and Scott Hanna, colorist Dono Sánchez-Almara, and letterer Clayton Cowles, Morbius leans into the anti-hero’s horror roots, telling a story of scientific hubris that makes the vampire even more monstrous. In an...

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  • This week in Savage Love: Quickies

    My ex-girlfriend, who I dated for nine months, called me two months after we broke up and accused me of giving her HPV. She was going on, telling me how I needed to tell any future person I had sex with that I have HPV. I’m a 38-year-old man, and I’ve never had any signs or symptoms of any sexually transmitted

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  • Billy Porter on #GivingTuesday and why it's time to "give zero f's"

    Every year, the holiday shopping season officially kicks into high gear the day after Thanksgiving with the door-busting madness of Black Friday. If that weren’t enough, the proliferation of online shopping brought about the advent of Cyber Monday, stretching the nightmare of consumerism through the weekend and bringing it into our homes. As a way to combat the commercialization of the holidays, Giving Tuesday was started in 2012 as an international movement to promote charitable giving at a...

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  • The Giant Days team reunites to do Wicked Things in this exclusive first look

    Giant Days captured the hearts of comic readers when it debuted in 2015, telling joyful, hilarious, and deeply relatable stories about young people at university discovering what they want for their futures. Written by John Allison with art by Max Sarin, colorist Whitney Cogar, and letterer Jim Campbell, Giant Days earned major industry accolades with two Eisner Award wins this year, and the team isn’t wasting time getting back together after the title’s ending in October.

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  • WBEZ’s Making Beyoncé examines the rise of an icon

    Learning from other people’s mistakes is one of the easiest ways to save yourself from untold amounts of embarrassment and pain. But with thousands of years of human history to reflect on, it can be difficult to know which mistakes are worthy of consideration or what lessons there are to be learned. In his new podcast

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  • The White Lantern traps the Dark Knight in this Batman Universe exclusive

    The main line of Batman titles has been shrouded in darkness recently with the finale of Tom King’s Batman run and tie-ins to the “Year Of The Villain” event, but in the pages of Batman Universe, the Dark Knight has been on a much lighter adventure through space and time. Written by Brian Michael Bendis with art by Nick Derington, colorist Dave Stewart, and letterer Troy Peteri, Batman Universe is a delightful take on the character that pulls a lot from DC Animated Universe shows like Batman:...

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  • DC's compelling new Green Lantern story is a genre-blending delight

    At first glance, the most striking thing about Far Sector #1 is the artwork. That’s usually true of comic books, but it’s especially true of Jamal Campbell’s work on the cover and first few pages of this book. The design is bold and futuristic, refreshing for the Green Lanterns franchise and rooted in the changes made

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  • This week in Savage Love: Bluff calls

    I’m a heterosexual cis woman in a monogamous marriage. My husband and I have always struggled to connect sexually, mostly because he has extreme anxiety that makes doing anything new or different difficult. He’s been in therapy since before I met him, but it doesn’t seem to be helping much. His anxiety has caused him

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  • The Tea Dragon Festival returns to Katie O’Neill’s soft, soothing fantasy world

    Katie O’Neill’s The Tea Dragon Society was a kids-comics sensation when it came out in 2017, winning two Eisner Awards with its tender tale of a young girl creating friendships through the art of tea harvesting. O’Neill returns to the world of the adorable tea dragons with The Tea Dragon Festival (Oni), a significantly

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  • Let’s remember the 2010s’ most inescapable cultural moments

    In the third episode of our video retrospective I Remember The ’10s, The A.V. Club staff looks back at the indelible culture-shifters and inescapable moments that consumed our lives in the 2010s. In this installment, we remember the rise of Netflix, true crime podcasting, and the 2017 Oscar fiasco, while we lament the persistence of Minion culture and Alec Baldwin’s Trump impression.

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  • A demonic Batman rises in this Creature Of The Night finale exclusive

    The journey to Batman: Creature Of The Night #4 has been a long one. The series was originally announced in 2010 as a spiritual sequel to Kurt Busiek and Stuart Immonen’s Superman: Secret Identity, and health problems for Busiek and artist John Paul Leon resulted in a year-and-a-half delay between issues #3 and #4. But the series is well worth the wait, offering a chilling interpretation of the Batman mythos that leans into horror as it tells the story of wealthy orphan Bruce Wainwright and the...

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  • The podcasts that defined the 2010s

    Podcasts are just a different media beast. Unlike other topics currently being apprised in end-of-the-decade lists (the best movies/TV/books/interpretations of Met Gala themes), podcasting hardly existed in its current form at the dawn of the 2010s. And thanks to its journey from fledgling medium to an entrenched

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  • R.I.P. celebrated Playboy cartoonist Gahan Wilson

    Cartoonist Gahan Wilson—whose grimly funny, frequently macabre work often constituted one of the very best reasons to crack open a copy of Playboy (or The New Yorker, or National Lampoon, etc.)—has died. As reported by The New York Times, Wilson died this week from complications from dementia, at the age of 89. Read more

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  • Giant Days, Squirrel Girl, and the changing face of comics in the ’10s

    There are more kinds of comics and ways to read them than ever before, and books like Giant Days and Squirrel Girl have made the industry more welcoming.

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  • Kid Omega and Wolverine butt heads in this X-Force #2 exclusive

    Jonathan Hickman’s work in House Of X and Powers Of X suggested that death was no longer going to be the go-to plot device for future X-Men stories, but just because characters can be resurrected doesn’t mean death loses all dramatic stakes. In the first issue of X-Force, Charles Xavier is assassinated by a team of assassins that break through Krakoa’s defenses by attaching the skin of the luck-altering mutant Domino to their bodies. His death isn’t going to be permanent and everyone is acting...

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