Politics Headlines

  • Hunt for crashed Lion Air jet's black box delayed by bad weather

    A renewed search for the cockpit voice recorder of a Lion Air jet that crashed into the Java Sea on Oct. 29 has been delayed for two days due to bad weather hampering the arrival of a specialized ship, the airline said.

    U.S.
  • Canada says China has granted consular access to second detainee

    Canadian diplomats received consular access on Sunday to Michael Spavor, the second of two men detained by China over the past week.

    CNBC
  • Iowa Poll: Republicans back the President, but welcome challengers

    Two-thirds of Iowa's Republican voters say they would definitely vote to re-elect Trump if the general election were held today, but nearly as many say the state's party ought to welcome challengers to the President to Iowa's first-in-the-nation caucuses, according to a new CNN/Des Moines Register/Mediacom poll. The President's strength among the state's registered Republican voters is clear in the poll, with Trump earning an 81% approval rating, a 77% favorability rating, and majorities...

    WPLG
  • Ryan Zinke’s Legal Troubles Are Far From Over

    Investigations into the departing interior secretary’s actions will probably not end with his resignation, and may cloud his political future.

    www.nytimes.com
  • Court: 'Stand your ground' immunity also applies to Florida police

    Florida police officers can justify using deadly force and seek immunity from prosecution through the state's "stand your ground" self-defense law just like anyone else in the state, the Supreme Court of Florida recently ruled. The immunity is a key feature: "Stand your ground" lets judges declare someone immune from prosecution if they find certain facts in favor of the killer in pretrial hearings, avoiding trial altogether in a disputed shooting. Police officers already had been able to claim...

    WPLG
  • Hill report criticizes Silicon Valley's help in Russia investigation

    The Senate Intelligence Committee has been advised that social media companies might have provided the "bare minimum" amount of data to aid the panel's investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election, according to a person familiar with a report commissioned by the committee. The committee hired an online intelligence firm to review data on Russian social media accounts that posed as American accounts. The data, much of which has not yet been made public, was provided to...

    WPLG
  • A Nonbinding UN Human Rights Agreement Can Still Be Powerful

    Jill Goldenziel Security, Global Governance This will be a meaningful framework for better migration management that will improve international security and human rights. In Marrakech this month more than 180 countries will affirm the United Nations Global Compact for Safe, Orderly, and Regular Migration. What began with great optimism as an open, transparent, and inclusive process that would include all of the world’s states has been clouded by global political controversy over the compact...

    The National Interest
  • The Other Paris Peace Treaty (And Why the Spanish-American War Still Matters)

    Aroop Mukharji Security, Europe The 1898 Treaty of Paris that ended the Spanish-American war changed U.S. foreign policy and the course of history. In 2019, countries around the world will commemorate the centenary of the Paris Peace Conference that produced the Treaty of Versailles. That agreement ended World War One, a brutal, unnecessary, and immensely consequential war, but neither the treaty nor the war drastically altered American foreign policy. America continued to invade its...

    The National Interest
  • How to Wage Political Warfare

    Hal Brands, Toshi Yoshihara Politics, Eurasia Both Russia and China are governed by opaque, highly centralized and increasingly personalized governments that are well suited to the darker arts of statecraft. Political warfare, for such regimes, is second nature. POLITICAL WARFARE is back, and the United States is losing. As great-power competition has intensified in recent years, China and Russia have undertaken multi-pronged offensives to undermine American influence and erode the U.S.-led...

    The National Interest
  • Saudi Arabia: The Choice the United States Has to Make

    Paul R. Pillar Security, Middle East The simple notion that any enemy of my enemy is my friend is overriding sober calculation of how Saudi Arabia’s conduct does or does not support U.S. interests. LONG BEFORE “transactional” became a cliché applied to policies of Donald Trump, the term accurately described the U.S.-Saudi relationship. The partnership brought together the world’s most important democracy and a family-run autocracy that was medieval in its mores and allied internally with...

    The National Interest
  • Inside the Beltway: Levin, Beck merger: Up front and refreshing

    The recent media merger between CRTV and TheBlaze — founded by conservative broadcast titans Mark Levin and Glenn Beck, respectively — is fired up, clearly focused on both audience and marketplace, and ready to rumble. The new hybrid is Blaze Media, an appropriate name since the entity drew 2 billion

    www.washingtontimes.com
  • Obamacare ruling sets up health care fight

    President Trump says a federal judge's decision to strike Obamacare in its entirety is an early Christmas gift that clears the decks for a health care plan in the new year. "We are going to end up with incredible health care, which is the way it should have been from

    www.washingtontimes.com
  • House conservatives support Trump on border wall funding standoff

    House conservatives are cheering President Trump on in his desire for a government shutdown, saying they have his back in the standoff over border wall money. Though party leaders have been reluctant to test the GOP's strength, the conservatives insist they should vote on a bill containing $5 billion for

    www.washingtontimes.com
  • Nigeria's farmer-herder clashes have left over 3,600 people dead, Amnesty says

    Clashes in Nigeria between farmers and semi-nomadic herders have killed more than 3,600 people since 2016, most of them this year, Amnesty International said on Monday, in a report documenting an upsurge in violence that could sway the results of February 2019 elections.

    U.S.
  • New Brexit vote would 'break faith' with British, says May

    Prime Minister Theresa May will state her opposition to a second Brexit referendum on Monday, telling parliament such a vote would "break faith" with British people and do "irreparable damage" to politics.

    U.S.
  • UK signs air service deal with Switzerland for post-Brexit flights

    British transport minister Chris Grayling will sign an agreement with Switzerland on Monday to ensure air services continue to operate between the two countries after Brexit.

    U.S.
  • Uber welcomes, unions criticize UK plan to maintain flexible gig economy

    Uber Technologies Inc welcomed on Monday the British government's response to a review into workplace rights, which looks set to preserve the business models of gig economy companies, but unions rubbished the business ministry's plans.

    U.S.
  • Thousands Brave Cold to Protest Hungary’s Far-Right Leader, in Rare Dissent

    Opponents of Viktor Orban demonstrated again on Sunday, in what has become one of the most sustained displays of street opposition since the prime minister entered office.

    www.nytimes.com
  • Beto O'Rourke doubles down on dumb when it comes to the border

    Just when you think politics cannot get any stupider in this country, in skateboards Robert Francis O'Rourke. That would be the same Robert Francis O'Rourke of privileged upbringing and expensive boarding school pedigree who today goes by "Beto" because it sounds Hispanic now that he has decided to get into

    www.washingtontimes.com
  • Foreign minister: Trump admin. working to extradite Turkish cleric

    The Trump administration is working on the extradition of exiled cleric Fethullah Gulen for his alleged role in an attempted coup in Turkey two years ago, Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlüt Cavusoglu claimed Sunday. Cavusoglu's comments are at odds with recent statements from the US State and Justice Departments and reflect the fractious nature of a relationship that has faced multiple flashpoints over the past three years. Among those disputes: policy towards Syria, the arrest of an American...

    WPLG
  • Trump says he will review the case of soldier charged with murder

    President Donald Trump said on Sunday that he will review the case of Army Major Matt Golsteyn, a Special Forces soldier and Afghanistan veteran charged with pre-meditated murder. "At the request of many, I will be reviewing the case of a 'U.S. Military hero,' Major Matt Golsteyn, who is charged with murder. He could face the death penalty from our own government after he admitted to killing a Terrorist bomb maker while overseas. @PeteHegseth @FoxNews" Trump tweeted. Golsteyn has been charged in...

    WPLG
  • Pemex aims for splash in shallow waters, retreats from the deeps

    Mexican state-run oil giant Petroleos Mexicanos will focus on existing shallow water assets and refining next year at the expense of riskier, deepwater projects under a new government that has vowed to turn around the ailing company.

    U.S.
  • Saudi Arabia denounces U.S. Senate position on Khashoggi: statement

    Saudi Arabia's foreign ministry denounced "recent position of US senate" saying the Jamal Khashoggi incident is a crime that does not reflect the policy of the kingdom, in a statement carried by Saudi Press Agency late on Sunday.

    U.S.
  • Canada is looking for a way out of big Saudi arms deal, says PM

    Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, speaking in an interview that aired on Sunday, said for the first time that his Liberal government was looking for a way out of a multibillion-dollar arms deal with Saudi Arabia.

    U.S.